Led Zeppelin Pellon

Led Zeppelin Pellon
This is a wonderful, numbered, specially printed serigraph produced in a limited edition of 500.
Serigraphy came into its own in the 1960s with the advent of Pop Art and Op Art. Artists such as Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Josef Albers, Peter Max, and Richard Anuzkiewicz saw the medium's commercialism—which previously worked against its artistic acceptance—as a positive asset.
At its most elementary level, serigraphy involves covering portions of silk or a similar material with a coating. First, the silk is stretched on a frame attached with hinges to a baseboard. Then, the window for the image is masked with tape, and a coating of shellac or glue is applied.
Any part of the silk left exposed becomes the design through which ink or other pigment such as paint is pressed using a squeegee or brush. This simplified description hardly does justice to the technical flexibility and artistic versatility of the medium but the results produced are astounding.
By the time this concert took place in 1969, Led Zeppelin was in full swing—both on tour and in the studio. The album, Led Zeppelin II, had reached the number one position on both the U.S. and U.K. charts. On the tours at this time, Led Zeppelin often played in smaller clubs and ballrooms, but its popularity soon grew to the point where it played larger auditoriums and stadiums. This poster also advertised the Rolling Stones show the following week at Oakland Coliseum, which is represented by the BG201 poster in the Bill Graham series. These gorgeous serigraphs were produced in the early 90s by Artrock. They are considerably larger than the original posters.
By the time this concert took place in 1969, Led Zeppelin was in full swing—both on tour and in the studio. The album, Led Zeppelin II, had reached the number one position on both the U.S. and U.K. charts. On the tours at this time, Led Zeppelin often played in smaller clubs and ballrooms, but its popularity soon grew to the point where it played larger auditoriums and stadiums. This poster also advertised the Rolling Stones show the following week at Oakland Coliseum, which is represented by the BG201 poster in the Bill Graham series. These gorgeous serigraphs were produced in the early 90s by Artrock. They are considerably larger than the original posters.
Tuten acquiesced to the power of the blimp in this Led Zeppelin poster. The concert was typical Graham fare and mixed the country-sounds of the Bonzo Dog Band with jazz-great Rahsaan Roland Kirk & His Vibration Society. Kirk insisted that his band be named on event posters and billboards, but occasionally, and to his great annoyance, the name didn't always fit.
About Randy Tuten
Randy Tuten is the only poster artist whose work spans five decades of design for The Fillmore. The 23 year-old San Francisco native was hired by Bill Graham in January, 1969, and their mutual taste for traditional, readable design style led to a long-lasting work relationship. Although influenced by the compositions of "Fillmore Five" artists Mouse, Kelley and Griffin, Tuten avoided "... Heavy meaning in my posters." Tuten's style reflected his skill as a draftsman, and his designs evolved into an eclectic mix of graphic imagery, lettering and photographs.