By August 15, 1969, hundreds of thousands of people had flocked to upstate New York to attend Woodstock, the epic 3-day music festival that was said to be the capstone of a cultural movement. The world had never seen anything like it. Sam Yasgur convinced his father Max to allow the event to be held on their 600 acre farm in Bethel, New York. Most attendees didn't buy tickets, so the promoters didn't make any money until the movie and record were released. The biggest and best bands of the era played day and night to the lucky folks who made history just by being there. 20-mile traffic jams, heavy rain, mud, and insufficient food and accommodations did nothing to mar the collective, peace-loving spirit of the happening. It boasted scorching, legendary performances, like The Who's reflective "See Me, Feel Me" as the sun rose, Janis Joplin belting out "Piece of my Heart" to a crowd of half a million, and Jimi Hendrix's incendiary, distorted version of "The Star Spangled Banner" to a relatively empty field on the very last day of Woodstock. The world still hasn't fully recovered, and probably never will.

Our vintage concert programs feature performances from the Fillmore, Fillmore East, Winterland, the Avalon Ballroom and more.

About David Byrd

As the exclusive designer for the Fillmore East, Byrd produced 11 posters for Bill Graham between 1968-71. With his architectural training, powerful linework and sense of dimension and balance, Byrd said his understanding of symmetry "... Led [me] right up to Art Nouveau. Add to that my LSD experiences, and it all connected up somehow." Byrd's credits include concert poster designs for Jimi Hendrix, the Who, the Grateful Dead, movie posters for Godspell and Jesus Christ Superstar, posters for The Pasadena Playhouse productions, cover art for TV Guide, and work for Warner Bros.